2018 Hayman Fellowship Winners

The University of California – New Center for Psychoanalysis Interdisciplinary Psychoanalytic Consortium (UC-NCP IPC) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 Hayman Graduate Fellowship.  The Hayman Fellowship aids psychoanalytically informed research on the literary, cultural and humanistic expressions of genocide, racism, ethnocentrism, nationalism, interethnic violence, and the Holocaust.  Our Endowment supports studies in the psychodynamics of personal, group, and international crisis management, de-escalation, conflict resolution, and peace processes. The fellowships are intended to provide for dissertation research in scholarly resources, archives, libraries, academic contacts, and to provide support for the final writing for publication of a project whose major research has been completed.

Each of the three winners was awarded $5,000 in support of the final stages of dissertation writing:

Farzad Amoozegar-Fassie (Anthropology, UCLA)—“Fleeing an Ongoing Civil War and the Plea for a Safe Haven: Being a Syrian Refugee Child in America”

This dissertation explores the experienes of trauma among Syrian refugee children in New Jersey from an inner and inter-subjective perspective within the present political climate of xenophobia.

 Rajbir Judge (History, UC Davis)—“Prophetic Sovereign: A People’s History of Maharaja Duleep Singh”

 This project studies the anxieties and uncertainties that governed relationships between secular British strategies of governance and the Sikh tradition by examining the how peoples globally contested the meaning of sovereignty through the deposed Maharaja Duleep Singh of Punjab at the end of the 19th Century” (creative/Post-Colonial studies with Psychoanalytic infusion).

 Kirsty Singer (Comparative Literature, UC Irvine)—“Intimate Historiographies: Race, Psychological Crisis, and Poetics in the American Mid-20th Century”

 This work proposes to “reckon with America’s historical unconscious and its constitutive role in the formation of the individual psyche. Her dissertation will reframes the mid-century poetics preoccupation with “racialized crisis of being” by investigating the 1950-70 period in which profound anxiety and tensions around whiteness surfaced among canonical avant-garde and activist poets—Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, Amiri Baraka, Jack Spicer, John Sinclair and Jane Stembridge—(all engaged in different ways in the antiracist organizing of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s